Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for October, 2017

Who doesn’t love a good infographic? They’re a great way to summarise data in a form that appeals to a range of learners.

While watching a series of tutorials on helping students get more out of Office 2016, I discovered the People Graphs add in. As an English teacher, what stood out was the presenter’s description of the add in as enabling “story telling with data.” Now that, I get!

Firstly, make sure you’re working with data that can be logically transferred to visual representation. Think data that would work as a bar graph. You’ll also need to have that data saved in an Excel Spreadsheet. In Excel, go to the Insert button then select Store then choose Recommended. From there, find the People Graph add in.

Once installed, you’ll find People Graph option under the Insert button. The add in will instantly create chart in the spreadsheet which you can edit using two icons in the top right of the chart created. The icon on the left allows you to create the chart with your data so you can select the columns you want used, change the title etc while the gear icon allows you to change the layout – colour schemes, icons used etc. Just keep in mind the audience and the type of presentation you’ll be using the infographic in before getting too carried away!

The completed chart is a jpeg so simply save it to your clipboard by right clicking and saving the image generated wherever you want to use it -Word, Sway, Powerpoint or OneNote.

I’ve been surveyed several times by our Economics students and imagine People Charts would be great for them when analysing data collected. The visual nature of the add in would also be ideal for young learners to help them grasp how raw data can be transformed and applied.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Surveying students about their learning preferences and progress used to be a cumbersome process involving screes of paper and (from me at least), a calculator. But there are tools and apps that make the process much easier – for teachers and students who need to conduct surveys as part of their learning/for course planning/professional development.

  1. Excel Survey Tool – Firstly, log in to your OneDrive account then select the New Excel Survey option. Excel will prompt you through the steps which involve giving your survey a title/subtitle, selecting the response type (you need to tick required to make the question compulsory) and adding new questions. There’s a text box option if you want longer form answers, and if you’re like me and create surveys organically, you can re-order questions by dragging and dropping individual questions. Save in View to preview the survey and edit before sharing. Like other MS tools, there’s a Share option in the top task bar to the right. This creates a URL linking to the survey. You choose where to send the link – it could be in an email or in a class notebook , in a word document or on a website. Just type in the names of the recipients and voila! You can open the results in the Excel spreadsheet and from there create charts.
  2. Microsoft Forms – This app is part of Office 365. My Media Studies students have used it successfully for the past two years as part of planning to create film trailers and short films. Again, you need to log into 365 then select the Office Forms app to get started. We brainstormed questions together on the board based around the requirements of the Achievement Standard we were working from and, to ensure individual students could share their results when they got together in groups of three later. The surveys can be shared like Excel Survey via the Share button. Once you have reached the respond by date (it pays to have a cut off), Forms will collate the data and create charts highlighting key findings. Here’s a link to one of my students blog posts based around their survey results.

Whichever option you choose, both Excel Survey Tools and Microsoft Forms are ideal for helping learners to gather and analyse data. Just remember you can only share with people within your organisation. This worked for us as at Level 2  our brief was to make a film/trailer for our peers. Slightly trickier for level 3 when the brief was to make a short film for the wider Taieri community. Students included staff in that survey.

Read Full Post »

To increase the chances of lower ability senior students gaining literacy in English (the five reading and five writing credits that can only be gained via English), we added AS 91105 Use Information Literacy Skills to Form a Developed Conclusion to the course programme. This standard offers lots of practical skills. Although students in this course are not necessarily aiming for further tertiary study, the skills that underpin AS 2.8 students are vital for all students needed in know how to find, evaluate and synthesize information. In other words, it’s a standard designed to create 21st Century learners and thinkers.

Gone are the days when we’d stand glumly at the photocopier of the local library feeding it 20c coins and copying pages of books to take home, review and draft from. The internet has made information gathering much easier but has created new challenges.

With junior students, I promote the need for A.C.C (authenticity, credibility and currency), show them fakes websites and a range of search engines as part of formal writing. For our low ability senior students, I do pretty much the same but add in Boolean searches, databases usage, attribution and cittation.

Microsoft has a couple of tools that can help with both finding and saving information.

1.Researcher – If you have access to the full version of Microsoft Word (make sure you have the full version installed and are running the latest version of Windows), there’s a handy tool in the ribbon at the top to help with research. Simply open the Reference tab, then click Researcher and a side pane will open to the right of the document you’re working on. In the search box, type a keyword and press Enter. From there, a selection of scholarly writing will appear. Students can select the site they need or even part of an article and add it to their document. For AS 2.8, they will need to synthesize the material along with information gathered and use it to answer their focus question. Researcher automatically adds a citation with the content which makes creating a bibliography later easy.

2. Smart Look Up – this feature can help students to clarify their research when collecting information off the internet. If a student has copied a portion of an article into a word document but is struggling to understand the meaning, they simply select a word, go to Review button and select Smart Look Up. This will open an Insight pane to the right of the document they’re working on and provide more information related to the word or phrase including links to related research. (Insights are sourced via a Bing search). Students can drag those links directly into their text and add it to their research. Smart Look Up helps students engage with their research and, make sure they’re getting relevant information.

3. Clipping information – if you use OneNote, you’ll be able to download OneNote Clipper. Simply go to OneNote.com/clipper and add clipper to the favourites bar. To “clip” a page from the internet, click the Clip to OneNote button on the favourites bar and a dialogue box will pop up. The student can decide where to save the information to in OneNote via a drop down. If they’re on a site with lots of clutter, select the Article Only icon and only the text will save. The URL for the source site saves to the bottom of the “clipped” material which again helps with creating a bibliography later on.

I watched tutorials on both these tools via the Microsoft in Education website. It’s a great place for some PD when you have a moment. The tutorials are short, visual and demonstrate how Microsoft tools and apps can be applied across a range of subject areas.

 

Read Full Post »

This year my school purchased Adobe licenses enabling our Media Studies students to use Premiere Pro. While I had previously worked for a TV production company (in Comms!) so understood the production process, the murky depths of editing suites were not places I spent lots of time. Not surprisingly, coming up to speed with industry standard editing software on my own proved to be a steep learning curve.

It’s good to be reminded of how our learners feel when faced with new material and skills which needs to be developed to a measurable standard within a required time frame. So when in doubt, start at the beginning.

Adobe’s website offers a range of short tutorials that explain the process from a basic starting point (importing footage) to more advanced Premiere Pro features (using After Effects).

After watching the beginner tutorials, I devised a series of worksheets and then played the tutorials over the TV screen as we worked through the answers together. This meant I could pause and re-watch parts that the students

found confusing while a couple of students who knew the basics watched some more specialized tutorials.

The beginner page enables you to download footage of a hoover boarder and then play around with that. I downloaded the footage on all 8 of our class laptops and once we finished the beginner tutorials, we used this footage as out first play around. Students worked in pairs and then presented their short clip to class.

Overall the standard of their trailers and short films produced this year were vastly improved on last year when we didn’t have Premiere Pro. Most of the class just scratched the surface with what the software can do but a few really pushed themselves using Green Screen, experimenting with colour saturation and frame rates.

 

Here’s a few basic tips based on our seven week foray:

  • make sure students import their footage onto a local network drive – working with clips off a USB means although you think you have started saving a rough cut on your timeline, next time you log in, the computer won’t be able to locate the footage.
  • become familiar with the interface – there are four panels to work with and each has its own purpose
  • the tilda key is a quick way to view in full screen. There are other short cut keys, plus drop down options for various editing features. Students soon work out their own preferences.
  • in the timeline, the coloured lines above the video and audio tracks show you what has been rendered. When scenes are glitching, you probably need to render them. Select the in and out points, then render in to out (in the Select drop down). The red line above the offending footage will change from red to green. I encouraged students to render individual scenes before adding into the timeline.
  • time – how I wish we had more. Ideally, I’d get students to have a week practising filming in Term 1 then use that footage to put together a practice clip in Term 2 before even starting to film and edit their own project. Sadly, this wasn’t possible in the time available.
  • there is pretty much nothing you can’t solve by watching a tutorial – except poor camera work and sound recording although even then, you can sometimes make a silk purse with a sow’s ear although this is time consuming and not the recommend approach!

 

Read Full Post »