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Archive for the ‘public speaking’ Category

Here’s an aspirational speech from an 11 year old! Her speech emulates the TED talks style of presentation with lots of gestures, intonation and rhetorical questions. I often use video of young TED presenters as exemplars but I have never seen a student pick up on the presentation style as explicitly as Florence in her Gender Stereotypes speech.

As the epitome of public speaking, the ideas trust TED also provides a wealth of useful resources, such as the tips presentation below from Chris Anderson the person charged with helping speakers polish their performances. Get students to note five tips as they watch/listen then share with a partner then do a whole class mindmap on board. It’s a great way to reinforce key features they need to be aware of when writing and presenting their ideas.

 

There’s also a really great article here on presentation literacy featuring famous (and infamous) TED presenters who have conquered fears of public speaking to own the the big red dot!

Oh and if you’re keen on a really great gender stereotypes related TED Talk, show students the following presentation by media expert and proud Dad Christopher Bell. I’ve shown my Level 2 literacy class this year as a starter and then ecnouraged them to find a TED Talk they could respond too. It proved quite motivational for a class of book-phobic teens and they chose on a range of topics from running to transgender discrimination.

 

 

 

 

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Probably the most dreaded activity for many students is oral presentations. Our school guidance counsellors have told me they get lots of visits from extremely anxious students around this time.

Providing supportive environments, a back up stool for shaky legs, making preparatory tasks fun, viewing inspirational speeches for motivation all help but for a core group of learners, none of this really works. You could argue that speeches are just one of those evil necessities (like going to the dentist) but where’s the engagement in that?!

And while we might be able to jolly our juniors along, for the Level 2 alternative English students I teach, opt out rates are high. Four credits up for grabs but if you’re terrified of public speaking and chasing reading and writing credits, it’s a no brainer.

I think for those students, a better selling point might be developing more relevant, accessible tasks. Broad topics like “adaptation”, “choices”, “courage” are simply not doing it for them.

As long as we can assess against the schedule – is it appropriate for the audience, does it contain conventions suitable for the type of presentation, is it crafted and controlled, are a range of speaking techniques used in the delivery – alternatives to persuasive formal speeches need to be offered.

  1. Small group seminars – a seminar is more interactive than a formal speech. It should contain some visuals, some direct engagement with the audience and be informative. With Level One students, I’ve used this activity and linked it to career planning. We started by completing the career quest survey online, whittled the job options down to three then one, carried out research and developed a seminar on a specific career/industry. There are clear links here to with the Vocational Standards on offer.
  2. How To presentations -Instructional clips are popular. From making loom bands to using a green screen, it’s likely that students have consulted YouTube at some stage so this is a genre they’re familiar with. Due to the lower levels of crafting involved, this is probably better suited to junior students. Here’s some links to clips some American students have created and presented on Smart Phone apps which range from 30 secs to two minutes. Students need to produce story boards, scripts and practise their delivery. Here’s the backgrounder with rationale explained in detail.
  3. Mihimihi – This is an introductory speech that shares whakapapa (genealogy, ancestral ties) and other relevant information. A mihi is presented in Te Reo. A few years ago, a junior student who was struggling to write a persuasive speech nailed this. He began presenting his mihi as per the conventions and then proceeded to unpack the relevance of each reference point to his identity. I still have the scrawly, hand written transcript.  A Level One student also chose this option and invited her whanau to school for the presentation. Again, it one of the best pieces of work she completed all year. Engaging, crafted and delivered with pride.This may just provide the deeper connection some students seek and also help them to draw strength from their whanau and whakapapa thus overcoming nerves.

Here’s a clip on making a visual mihi too:

There’s a few alternatives. I’d be keen to know what other people have tried as well.

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