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Archive for the ‘Writing’ Category

If you’ve been following the news lately, you’ll be aware that secondary school teachers are seeking an improvement in teaching and learning conditions in New Zealand schools. One crucial thing we are looking for is support for the increasing number of students with behavioral and learning difficulties being placed in our classrooms with no additional resourcing.

I welcomed one such student to my Year 9 English class. He became student 29. The rap sheet was long but equally concerning was the learning levels and associated needs. So what’s a teacher to do?

I can’t ignore him because that could lead to outbursts that will impact everyone’s learning and potentially place us in danger. Philosophically, I believe that despite his negative attitude, student X is a human being who deserves a chance. There are reasons beyond his control leading to some of these challenges.

On the other hand, I simply don’t have time to make an individual learning programme for a student who is probably two or even three levels of the New Zealand Curriculum below where he needs to be.

When he joined us, we had just started a unit of work on formal writing.  I quickly realized I needed to find a way to adapt the tasks or things would go pear shaped very quickly. Of course I realise that’s our job but those outside education must consider the context. Our classes already cater for recent immigrants with no support who can arrive with zero English language skills, international students, children with dyslexia/dyspraxia (both diagnosed and undiagnosed), ORS funded students with intellectual disabilities (who have teacher aides but still take time to socially integrate into class activities) and the list goes on.

Day 1 – I started by setting him up with ClassNotebook and spending 15 minutes showing him how to naviagte the LMS. Because he was prone to losing his password and log in I popped it on a post note on the wall he faced with a laptop so that couldn’t be an issue.

Day 2 – The next day, we watched a documentary on boy racers, brainstormed ideas in support or against them and then students had to write persuasive paragraphs in their journals. I sat down with student X and got him to discuss his ideas, prompting him and encouraging him to use the S.E.X.Y structure of paragraph writing. We then crafted them into paragraph which I typed.

Day 3 -Language features – Student X picked a topic (tazers) and brainstormed three ideas about why Police shouldn’t use them. I typed up a paragraph for him. Then we went back through and I pointed out and colour coded formal writing features.

Day 4 – Picking a topic for our assessment and researching supporting points. Student X picked one and brainstormed ideas. He was then given time to find examples to support his ideas (research)

Day 5 -8 – Drafting an essay. Student X did this on ClassNotebook. I supplied feedback by making audio recordings to suggest ways to make paragraphs better or a smiley sticker if he had done well. He really struggled with editing and crafting – once it was written down, it was done as far as he was concerned. His short attention span meant he found it difficult to go over the same paragraphs more than once.

Overall this approach enabled me to build a more productive realtionship with student X. I set clear expectations that in English, he was expected to do the work like other students BUT I tried to make sure that work was pitched at his level, gave him choices, clear deadlines, heavily scaffolded the assessment task and gave him one on one time.

I’d like to report the story had a happy ending but issues outside the classroom meant he was removed for a spell. Hopefully when he comes back we can pick up where we left off using ClassNotebook to engage student X and progress his learning.

Below are screen shots (click on them for a clearer view) of the scaffolded tasks we worked through for formal writing:

Day 2student dictates a paragraph based on visual text and class brainstorm

Day 3 – language features and paragraph structure

Day 4 – pick topic, form opinion, brainstorm points, research

 

 

Days 5 – 8 Draft, craft and edit essay. Students gets feedback visually and as audio recording

Structure broken down – student chose previous topic rather than one from list

 

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Being open minded is key for learning new skills, self-reflection and professional growth as a teacher in 2018.

The MIEE 2018 (inaugural?!) Hui held in the April school holidays offered a smorgasbord of opportunities for teachers keen to develop their digital technology kete, extend their ability to use a range of tools available via Microsoft apps and programmes and connect with other educators.

The problem with a smorgasbord is it is sometimes difficult to know what to choose. We were truly spoiled for choice.

Initially, I wasn’t sure if Lynette Barker’s Creativity with Literacy sharing session would be to my palette. Me a South Island based secondary teacher of English and Media Studies in a large coeducational state secondary school. Lynette a teacher Librarian in a Catholic primary school across the Tasman.

Time to ditch the diet.

Not only did Lynette present us with an exciting menu of ideas, she backed this up with examples, resources and honest answers to our questions. The added bonus is that following the hui, Lynette has continued to share resources via the twittersphere.

Her ideas help bridge the gap between written text and digital technology with activities that seamlessly integrate both and, were clearly linked to learning objectives.

Some of those ideas were:

  1. Telling a story with music  – using MS lens and PPT, scan pages from a text and then invite students to match the words with music. Lynette used Red Fox.
  2. Reversioning a story – using MS Lens and OneNote with a free pdf of a children’s illustrated book (available here – http://mybirthdaybunny.com ), students use a stylus to “graffiti” the original version of My Birthday Bunny with their own version.
  3. Augmented reality – use MS Paint 3d to add moving images to a story. Take a  pic of object, import to Paint 3d then animate via power point. (@ibpossum has had hour of fun with this 😉 )
  4. Comprehension and creativity – Lynette used Using Cups Held Out byJudith L Roth. Read to kids then gave them cup. Students  were asked to tell how they could show support to others OR whatever they took from story via photography. Their photos were then collated using Movie Maker.
  5. Vocabulary extension, development of  connotative and emotive language via blogging- using Piranaha’s Don’t Eat Bananas, students were invited to finish sentences from the story with their own words.  Using Last Tree in the City, students were asked to supply 10 words they associated with this story about environmental damage to word banks. They then did the same with A Forest, a story featuring a contrasting message.
  6. Catering for students with special educational needs –  Lynette set up a series of activities on One Note pages which were code protected. The student, working with a teacher aide, had to complete each activity to get a code to “unlock” the next task.

Like any meaningful PD, the proof is in the pudding. My goal is to develop and deliver a workshop for our teacher aides and share some of these ideas alongside those gleaned from Crispin Lockwood’s Immersion Session MS Learning Tools for Differentiation. The aim is to broaden the range of literary related activities offered to engage students with special learning needs and ESOL students.

And of course there are plenty of ways to adapt Lynette’s ideas for a secondary learning environment.

“Cups” could be used in Junior Media Studies to teach the Rule of Thirds as well as camera shot types and angles, Red Fox could be used to apply visual and verbal matching techniques for Media Studies and English students while the vocab extension activities would work alongside a short story/novel study or as a starter for Creative Writing.

 

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When searching for resources to use alongside Malala Yousafzai’s memoir I Am Malala next term, there seemed to be a gap in resources for the age group I will use the text with – Year 10s working at Level 4-6 of the NZC. Lots for younger readers and some very high brow analyses that would extend them but nothing that was a perfect fit in terms of learning objectives.

Using the resources available via the Global Women’s Institute as a starting point, I designed a unit of work encompassing memoir as a literary genre, the importance of education as well as a collaborative research and writing project culminating in a presentation on social justice using Microsoft Stream, one of the audio-visual presentation apps available via the Office 365 suite of products.

The overall objectives of this specific unit of work are to enable students to:

  • Discuss the importance of education and gender equity; appreciating educational opportunites
  • Form and express opinions and emotions around Malala’s journey; developing empathy
  • Explore the effectiveness of memoir as a literary genre; developing critical literacy skills

As I began mapping out lessons for the four week unit, there were obvious opportunities to link our analysis with other core skill areas in the Junior English programme by using the text as a springboard for other tasks.

  • Impromptu speaking – using issues encompassed in I Am Malala as debating topics for the impromptu speech unit; watching Malala’s speech to UN and identifying oral presentation features.
  • Personal reading – recommendations based around other memoirs students can use for AS 1.10 Personal Reading

And of course there were clear links to other curriculum areas such as Social Studies where students studied apartheid in Term One. This provides further opportunities to utilise prior learning when choosing a topic for their end of unit presentation (see below).

Overall the lessons tick all the key competencies:

  • Thinking – about the importance of education and the value we place on it; gender equity
  • Relating to Others – when interviewing a Syrian student at our school about what being a Muslim means to him
  • Using language symbols and texts – when completing reflective writing activities and an essay
  • Managing Self – when creating a Stream presentation in and out of class to meet a deadline
  • Participating and contributing – to class discussions and debates on education, gender diversity, fundamentalism and other issues raised in the novel

Via Class Notebook students can access glossaries, pre-reading tasks, extension reading  and viewing opportunities, language activities, a recommended reading list, debate topics and the Stream assignment. Flipping the learning is a bonus as we head into Term 2. when, alongside the usual interruptions to timetabled classes, our classroom is undergoing a refit meaning we will be homeless for several weeks and working from other rooms. Planning ahead in this way will take some pressure off during this disruptive time – as long as we have access to computers in our allocated temporary room!

If you’re still with me, here are the lessons as the students will see them on Class Notebook (minus the video and pictures to breakup text!):

What is a memoir? 

In choosing to narrate the brutal attempt on her life, Malala Yousafzai chose the literary form known as MEMOIR. A memoir is designed to capture a certain moment in time.

Memoirs are characterised by their ability to mesh private feelings with public issues and raw emotions. They are not the same as autobiographies which tend to cover a person’s entire life and where the story unfolds in linear fashion. Memoirs also differ from diaries as memoirs allow for more reflective narration of important social and historical events.

The three forms all use first person narration. This means we only get one person’s point of view. Memoirs might not seem to use as many language features as poems or novels but if you read carefully, there is plenty of emphasis on pace, tone and language choices in I Am Malala.

 

Pre-reading activity: 

What do you know about Malala already?

What would you like to know?

What are you unsure of?

Watch the trailer for the documentary about Malala’s Life, read the prologue and note five facts you learned about Pakistan and Malala:

He Named Me Malala Official Trailer #1 (2015) – Documentary HD

Glossary of words to learn: 

Social Justice – justice in terms of the distribution of wealth, opportunities, and privileges within a society.

Pashtun – a member of a Pashto-speaking people inhabiting southern Afghanistan and NW Pakistan.

Swati –from the Swat Valley region of Northern Pakistan (see map)

Fundamentalism – a form of a religion, especially Islam or Protestant Christianity, that upholds belief in the strict, literal interpretation of scripture.

Code of Purdha – the term used primarily in South Asia, to describe in the South Asian context, the global religious and social practice of female seclusion that is associated with Muslim communities.

Ramadan – the ninth month of the Muslim year, during which strict fasting is observed from dawn to sunset.

Muslim –  a follower of the religion of Islam.

Islam – an Abrahamic monotheistic religion teaching that there is only one God (Allah) and that Muhammad is the messenger of God.

Quran – The Quran is the central religious text of Islam, which Muslims believe to be a revelation from God (Allah). It is widely regarded as the finest work in classical Arabic literature

Taliban – a Sunni Islamic fundamentalist political movement in Afghanistan currently waging war (an insurgency, or jihad) within that country

Jihad – a struggle or fight against the enemies of Islam

United Nations – an intergovernmental organization tasked to promote international cooperation and to create and maintain international order.

If you enjoy this style of writing visit the personal reading page in your Class Notebook for suggested texts for your personal reading responses.

Background reading: extra reading for those wishing to delve deeper –  

The Daily Show – Malala Yousafzai Extended Interview

New York Times articles about Malala

Class Dismissed: story about the 2009 documentary

FULL Amanpour Malala Interview

Language features activity: 

Language features and structural devices used which you need to be able to identify and explain are listed below. Your homework for the first week is to copy and paste this list into your NOVELS folder, write a definition for the term and find an example from the text. You can do this in groups and share the answers:

Foreshadow (page 9)

Memoir

Prologue

Epilogue

Allusion

Epigraph

Imagery

Simile

Metaphor

Symbolism

Maxim

Group assignment:

 

In pairs (plus one group of three), you will create, save and share a Sway presentation about a person noteworthy for their contribution to SOCIAL JUSTICE. 

Step 1 – Watch the Sway tutorial. More help can be found on the WELCOME page in this Class Notebook or by asking!

Step 2 –  Pick a person from the list below

  • Malala Yousafzai
  • Nelson Mandela
  • Eleanor Roosevelt
  • Martin Luther King
  • Mahatma Ghandi
  • Sir Apirana Ngata
  • Dame Whinia Cooper

Step 3 – Set up your Stream (sign in using school account)

Step 4 – Share tasks. (Suggest one person is researching/sourcing images while other works on slide creation but make sure you share the roles).

Your Stream must contain the following content: 

  • A brief biography – who are they, why are they important?
  • A diary entry written in first person as if you WERE the person. Similar to Malana’s Life with the Taliban columns. Reword yours to suit your subject’s background and key events in their life e.g: Nelson Mandela – Life in Robben Island prison etc
  • A fully developed SEXY paragraph responding to the statement: The World is  better place because of X….
  • A slide with at least five key terms defined that are related to your subject/their issue e.g. apartheid, Nobel Prize, Treaty of Waitangi.
  • A slide with 6-8 questions you would ask your person in an interview for the school newsletter.
  • Final slide attributing your sources (hyperlinks)

To break up the text, embed visual images, relevant audio  and video throughout your presentation.

Due Date: TBA!

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Introducing …. you

You know how certain songs trigger memories of special people, place and events? No matter where I am, as soon as I hear the opening chords to U2’s Where the Streets Have No Name, I’m instantly transported to the lane outside Lancaster Park in Christchurch on a sweltering November afternoon in 1989.

It’s hot, my stomach’s in my throat, can’t stop smiling as my sister, my bestie, my boyfriend and various associates prepare to embark on a musical adventure. It was much more than out first concert sans parents. The concert and associated road trip came to represent the end of an era for us as we finished high school and headed out to The Real World.

Those were the days.

At the start of the school year, a lot of teachers spend a few lessons getting to know new students (and names) via a range of introductory tasks and activities. It’s a great way to find out about their learning preferences and styles, interests and personalities!

Inspired by the aforementioned musical memory, I’ve developed a new introductory task for Year 10s called Playlist of My Life. The idea is to choose songs/artists that represent something about them and explain their choices. With the rise of Spotify etc I’m pretty sure they’ll know what a playlist is and hopefully, everyone can come up with half a dozen songs that mean something to them…

Here’s the lesson outline:

Teachers’ preamble for Your Life as a Playlist:

When you make a playlist, you can organise it by artist or genre or around a theme (chill out songs) or a time (Summer 2018).

(Discuss other ways to organise a playlist. Check they understand genre.)

Here’s an example of a playlist a teacher made on her blog summarising her teaching experiences. (Show)

And here’s one that came from the novel Playlist for the Dead . Each chapter is named after a song on a playlist a boy made for his friend. (Show link to blog post. Inform students novel is in school library. Deals with sensitive issue of youth suicide)

Students intructions

  • The task
    • Create a playlist of 6-10 songs that tell me something about you
  • Picking songs

Choose songs that remind you of people, places, events, memories or just because you really like the artist.

  • What to include
    • The song title and artist and a brief explanation of why you chose the song. For example: I chose History by One Direction because it was our team song in 2015 when I played Under 12 rugby for Taieri. We used to sing it on bus trips and knew all the words. The song reminds me of the players in my team. Some of us have played together since we were five. It was also the year we won our grade so it was pretty memorable.
    • For example: I chose Elastic Heart by Sia because I really like the lyrics. The song is about being strong but also being able to be caring at the same time. I think it’s a good song for girls because it’s powerful. To me it means we shouldn’t let people think we are weak just because we are girls.
  • Presenting your playlist:
    • On refill and hand in named OR
    • Word online and share with me OR
    • PPT online and share with me
  • Optional extras: If completing the task electronically, you might include links to videos or hyperlinks to information about the artist or to lyrics.
  • Due date: Thursday February 8th

This is your first task for the year so make sure it’s you best work. Remember you only get one shot to make a first impression!

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A day late sorry but as I missed February and March EduBlogNZ challenge, thought I’d sneak in a quick post on @kaiakowilson’s Love-Hate Resources. Mine is not so much a resource as an assessment.  At our school, Year 10s complete units of work on creative writing this term which culminates in an assessment where they describe a character. The hate part of this process for me is repeating the assessment task, the love part is adding to the unit of work to refine, improve and differentiate activities for each cohort. While this helps to enhance the learning process for the students it also keeps things interesting for me.

The first resource/activity I have used is the Describe that Face from the good folks at Read Write Think. I use magazine pictures, paste them to coloured paper then randomly assign. Students write descriptions in their writing journals then, the next day, I put all the faces on the board, take in their writing and read aloud as the students match the words to the face. Lots of laughs. If they find it hard to start, we use the preface that the person has just entered the classroom as a guest speaker. How would they enter the room? What would they do first? What would they talk about? Why? How would they sound?  In a similar fashion, a former associate teacher put me on to Whose Shoes where you give each student a picture of a pair of shoes and they describe the person wearing them – it’s a bit harder then Describe that Face as it requires a bit more imagination but is also fun.

Another tried and trusted skill builder is this strong verbs activity which helps students improve the ways they describe character movement. This is great for classes who need to move around lots as you can ask individual students to act out ways of walking/talking before attempting written work.

Last year, I came across this fantastic powerpoint that really encapsulates teaching Show Don’t Tell. I modified it to include descriptions of people and then bolstered with starters from pinterest where students write down more colourful/vivid/interesting alternatives to dull words such as said, went, good, bad etc. As a starter I get them to write down 3-5 synonyms in their writing journals then put them into sentences. The writing board I’ve compiled also great synonyms, hooks, conclusions, structural tips and heaps of prompts – visual and written.

And this year, I have added The Literacy Shed to the mix, see previous post. This has really enabled me to differentiate core skills for my class which has several students who find writing a real struggle.

Finally, modelling. I’m a great believer in showing students what we need/want them to do. Often with seniors, I’ll write my own trigger narrative (or whatever the task is) and go through the process with them. With juniors, I’ve described a grandparents and shared. I used a photo as a starter and encourage them to do the same with the assessment to assist with brainstorming.

So in answer to the questions that prompted the challenge: Hate the assessment, love the myriad of modified resources that help us to get there. I have complete freedom over the how we get there and base sequences of lessons on the students in front of me. The process is always reflective. This year more than considering what worked well last year, I’ve had to focus more on how to differentiate tasks to develop required skills. In terms of how would I replace the “resource” (assessment), I would like to see the Year 10s choose between setting or character and the Year 9s focus on narrative. At the moment, Year 9s assessment is a setting description, Year 10 character. We discuss options at department meetings and have changed the way we assess speaking for our junior students recently so changing the writing assessment is not impossible. I suppose at the end of the day, it’s about feeding back to HoDs – and being prepared to make changes rather than repeat the same tasks every year.

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I had a great conversation recently with a primary school teacher friend who’s also a literacy specialist/enthusiast/guru. What quickly became clear through our lengthy couch meanderings was that a lot of the challenges students face at secondary school are not due to lack of effort and energy expended by our primary colleagues earlier on.

Primary teachers have amazing depth of knowledge when it comes to breaking down concepts for students, modelling skills and providing awesome opportunities for them to develop their writing. Here’s an activity my 9 year-old son did at his school last week using James K Baxter’s My Town poem as a starter. And here’s Harrison’s poem:

The town

The town was usual enough; it had

A dairy,a bridge,a creek,a sky

Over it, and even a school that I never went to.

Me, my brother and Dad

Did what boys

Do best, made huts, biked

To the park, dodged the creepy old man

Who lived in our neighbourhood.

We jumped off the bridge,bought lollies

And chomped them down, scootered

To the beach

Doing nothing important.

By Harrison

Inspired by James K Baxter

Why then are so many of our students struggling with basic literary skills at secondary school? Are they simply reaching a plateau and stalling? Is the stagnation in written skills directly related to a drop off in reading? Is their inability to delay gratification a hand brake on truly engaging with the writing process? Did video kill the radio star?!

Among the many awesome suggestions my friend shared was The Literacy Shed website. I was drawn to the visual tasks available in the music videos “shed” and the animation “shed.” (Sheds being section on the site). A quick skim of suggested tasks yielded heaps of great ideas that we could use around novel studies, literary responses and tasks to inspire creative writing. There are also several sheds related to genre which could be helpful for secondary teachers.

While some of the content targets a younger age group, over the past three weeks I’ve been using clips and ideas from the music video and animation sheds as part of a unit on creative writing with my Year 10s. This group of learners is loosely referred to as “low to middle ability” but really, they are low – Level 1-4 of NZC currently based on beginning of year samples around writing, spelling age and reading. This prompted a complete rethink of several tasks I had planned to do with them.

The Literacy Shed has enabled me to implement differentiation in a meaningful way. For clips  used, I have tapped into some of the suggestions on the website then developed them further for a Year 10 audience. I felt it was also important to tell the students that I don’t expect all of them to complete all the tasks – they are quite open with where they are at currently and a quick word in their ear is all that is needed to get everyone underway.

We start each lesson with our writing journals and a clear learning objective which is on the board and stated verbally. This has ranged from “Today we are going to look at good ways of describing how people feel” to using words with clear connotations etc. We watch the clip once and I ask 4-5 focus oral questions to ensure we all know WHAT happened. This in itself can be an hilarious exchange of ideas …
I then project a series of journal tasks ranging from straight forward identifying to retelling to describing to more sophisticated skills such as point of view writing or dialogue or continuing a narrative. My big objective is to prepare them for a creative writing assessment in Term 2 where their task is to describe a character independently. By the end of this term they will have been exposed to:

  • Adjectives and adverbs
  • Strong verbs and neutral verbs
  • Synonyms and antonyms
  • Connotative language
  • Emotive language
  • Characterisation
  • Show Don’t tell

This leaves me the first few weeks of Term 2 to work on sentence structure, sentence starters and types as well as some basic punctuation. I also need to get them concentrating on their writing independently for longer periods of time, a big challenge for kids with such a large range of learning needs. Even if they are making small gains in their learning progressions, they are certainly all coming to class with their journals, ready to go and feeling as if they have achieved something. And hopefully, they are gaining some enjoyment out of the process.

Below are a couple of sample “lessons” you are most welcome to use:

 David Guetta – Titanium

In your journal DESCRIBE the opening scene, use show not tell. Do a OR b OR c:

a) draw and label scene

b) create a word bank

c) write a paragraph

2.Discuss with a partner. At the end:

Who is to blame?

Why?

Is the boy acting in self-defence?

Can he control his powers?

3. In your journal, do one:

  • If you could have any superpower what would it and why?
  • You wake up one morning and find you have incredible physical strength. What would you do? How would your life change?
  • Draw, design and label your own superhero. What power, name and costume would they have?
  • Write a newspaper report of the events that happened in the video. Include interviews with the teacher, parents and police-officers.

 Don’t Go – short animation

  1. Use adverbs to describe Pinky’s actions E.g: Danced vigorously
  1. Use adverbs to describe the cat’s actions E.g: Sprang menacingly
  1. Write a set of instructions as a list of bullet points on how to avoid being caught by a cat
  1. Retell the story from the cat’s point of view. Use strong verbs and adverbs to describe how events unfold….

I was minding my own business when suddenly, Pinky dashed in front of me…

Emile Sande – Free

  1. Make an emotion graph to show how the boy is feeling at different points in the video
  2. Summarise by writing a sentence that explains how the boy was feeling at the start and at the end
  3. Create an adjective bank to describe the boy’s feelings
  4. Create your own similes and metaphors for the boy’s actions

Eg: He flies like a bird.                                           He is as free as a bird.

  1. Research 5 facts about Jokke Summer

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I have a secret. Tucked away in a not-so-quiet corner of our school (due to current rebuild!) is my classroom. (That’s setting the scene – not the secret). And among the many students who come and go during the day, is a Year 9 class of keen writers. I can’t name them because a) that’s unprofessional and b) they are so clever, they may just read this.  So, let’s call them, Class x. Next week, Class x and I will continue our learning journey together. Having just marked 28 x 3 pieces of their NZ poetry assignment, I know it will be fun.

Now over the years, I’ve come across a vast array of wonderful online tools to assist with the creative writing process, which, as we know, isn’t always an easy one, even for clever people. In the spirit of tilting the classroom and, safe in the knowledge that these students always bring their best to the learning table, I’ve developed a writing lesson (actually give they’re not superhuman, probably lessons) using tools I think will develop their skills, challenge their thinking and (most importantly) enjoy.

Below are the exact instructions these guys will receive via the school’s LMS. The laptops are booked, the links work, the tools have been tested and I’m quietly confident they’ll love this one. I’ve given them options for both online and paper planning and intend to discuss and model mind mapping as most are stuck in the focus cloud rut. We also discussed plot structure and plot types at the end of last term.

These students are working at Level 4-6+ of the NZC so my intention was to keep things open-ended. I’ll let you know how they get on!

Greetings.

In this lesson, you will use an interactive online tool to select key elements of a practice story. Even better, this tool uses tried and trusted tropes (click to find out what a trope is) so in terms of engagement, you’re bound to do well! Our learning objective is for you to structure your writing so there is a clear beginning, middle and end.

Part one: Planning

1. Read this page

2. Add trope to your glossary of literary terms

3. Go to the periodic table of storytelling

4. Note that tropes are organised by column into different aspects of storytelling

5. Have a play – click on different elements (boxes) to find out more about the trope

6. Add any new words you encounter to the class glossary on the whiteboard in the relevant column – I will take a pic and upload to ultranet page for future reference 🙂

7.The discs at the bottom of the page show combinations of tropes for some well-known stories

8. Pick a minimum of four tropes from at least 3 columns to use in your story, read about them, note them down

9. Plan your story using the interactive planner or on paper

10. Print it or take a photo of it on your phone

Part two: Writing

1. Mind Map ideas – paper (see me for templates) or online (try bubblus, mindmup) Note: when mind mapping you are not simply dumping down ideas. The connections are important – especially for writing as your story must have a thread holding it all together in order to flow and be engaging.

2. Start writing – online or in your journal (whichever you prefer)

3. If you are writing online, copy and paste your finished work here , the Analyse This tool will give you a break down of sentence lengths and type, repeated words and phrases and punctuation usage. You can use these stats when editing.

Extra Reading: now or homework: These sites offer more tips on structure in writing, showing not telling and character development

1. Writing Forward – Show Don’t Tell

2. Writing Forward – Developing Characters

3. Helping writers become authors blog – 5 Elements of Story Structure

4. Christopher Brooker’s Seven Basic Plots

Word are like sunbeams, the more they are condensed the deeper they burn.  Robert Southey

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