Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘#MIEE’

What do to when a student returns from an alternative education programme two weeks before school exams?  And what if the student wasn’t in class for the novel and film study during the year?

OneNote is proving its worth again this week in providing me with platform to create a simple yet hopefully effective pre-exam IEP that is helping to keep my student engaged while also ensuring he is completing work similar to the rest of the class but pitched at his level.

Using Office Lens, I took pics of two contrasting settings in the classic text The Cay by Theodore Taylor.

I sent these from my phone to the novel page in the student’s class notebook and then presented him with the following activities to complete using Immersive Reader. I helped him to do the first activity and then he did the second. At the end, the student was presented with a series of questions about these two contrasting settings in the text. He recorded his answers using dictate in word and shared his answers with me.


Above is the description of Virginia where Phillip Enright and his Mum and Dad  come from.

  1. Listen to the page read using IMMERSIVE READER in VIEW.
  2. Now make a list of all the nouns NAMING words in the space below
  3. Next go back to Immersive reader and click the star (grammar options). Put NOUNS slider on. All the nouns will show up in purple. Did you get them all? If not, add the nouns you missed to your list.
  4. Now name all the adjectives (words that describe nouns) in the pace below:
  5.  Next, go back to immersive reader, click on the star, put adjectives on. They will show up in green. Did you get them all? If not, add more adjectives to your list.
  6. Finally, look at your list of nouns and adjectives. How would you sum up Virgina? Describe it in a two sentences below:

Virginia is ….


Above is the description of Willemstad on the Island of Curacao where the Enright family moved to

  1. Listen to the page read using IMMERSIVE READER in VIEW.
  2. Now make a list of all the nouns NAMING words in the space below
  3. Now go back to Immersive reader and click the star (grammar options). Put NOUNS slider on. All the nouns will show up in purple. Did you get them all? If not, add the nouns you missed to your list.
  4. Now name all the adjectives (words that describe nouns) in the space below.
  5. Go back to immersive reader, click on the star, put adjectives on. They will show up in green. Did you get them all? If not, add more adjectives to your list.
  6. Finally, look at your list of nouns and adjectives. How would you sum up Virginia? Describe it in a two sentences below:

Willemstad is …. 

Reflection – thinking about the setting

  1. Why did the family move to Willemstad?
  2. What is Mr Enright’s job?
  3. Why doesn’t Mrs Enright like Willemstad?
  4. Which place would YOU rather live in? WHY? (2 sentences, use because to explain your choice 
Advertisements

Read Full Post »

If you’ve been following the news lately, you’ll be aware that secondary school teachers are seeking an improvement in teaching and learning conditions in New Zealand schools. One crucial thing we are looking for is support for the increasing number of students with behavioral and learning difficulties being placed in our classrooms with no additional resourcing.

I welcomed one such student to my Year 9 English class. He became student 29. The rap sheet was long but equally concerning was the learning levels and associated needs. So what’s a teacher to do?

I can’t ignore him because that could lead to outbursts that will impact everyone’s learning and potentially place us in danger. Philosophically, I believe that despite his negative attitude, student X is a human being who deserves a chance. There are reasons beyond his control leading to some of these challenges.

On the other hand, I simply don’t have time to make an individual learning programme for a student who is probably two or even three levels of the New Zealand Curriculum below where he needs to be.

When he joined us, we had just started a unit of work on formal writing.  I quickly realized I needed to find a way to adapt the tasks or things would go pear shaped very quickly. Of course I realise that’s our job but those outside education must consider the context. Our classes already cater for recent immigrants with no support who can arrive with zero English language skills, international students, children with dyslexia/dyspraxia (both diagnosed and undiagnosed), ORS funded students with intellectual disabilities (who have teacher aides but still take time to socially integrate into class activities) and the list goes on.

Day 1 – I started by setting him up with ClassNotebook and spending 15 minutes showing him how to naviagte the LMS. Because he was prone to losing his password and log in I popped it on a post note on the wall he faced with a laptop so that couldn’t be an issue.

Day 2 – The next day, we watched a documentary on boy racers, brainstormed ideas in support or against them and then students had to write persuasive paragraphs in their journals. I sat down with student X and got him to discuss his ideas, prompting him and encouraging him to use the S.E.X.Y structure of paragraph writing. We then crafted them into paragraph which I typed.

Day 3 -Language features – Student X picked a topic (tazers) and brainstormed three ideas about why Police shouldn’t use them. I typed up a paragraph for him. Then we went back through and I pointed out and colour coded formal writing features.

Day 4 – Picking a topic for our assessment and researching supporting points. Student X picked one and brainstormed ideas. He was then given time to find examples to support his ideas (research)

Day 5 -8 – Drafting an essay. Student X did this on ClassNotebook. I supplied feedback by making audio recordings to suggest ways to make paragraphs better or a smiley sticker if he had done well. He really struggled with editing and crafting – once it was written down, it was done as far as he was concerned. His short attention span meant he found it difficult to go over the same paragraphs more than once.

Overall this approach enabled me to build a more productive realtionship with student X. I set clear expectations that in English, he was expected to do the work like other students BUT I tried to make sure that work was pitched at his level, gave him choices, clear deadlines, heavily scaffolded the assessment task and gave him one on one time.

I’d like to report the story had a happy ending but issues outside the classroom meant he was removed for a spell. Hopefully when he comes back we can pick up where we left off using ClassNotebook to engage student X and progress his learning.

Below are screen shots (click on them for a clearer view) of the scaffolded tasks we worked through for formal writing:

Day 2student dictates a paragraph based on visual text and class brainstorm

Day 3 – language features and paragraph structure

Day 4 – pick topic, form opinion, brainstorm points, research

 

 

Days 5 – 8 Draft, craft and edit essay. Students gets feedback visually and as audio recording

Structure broken down – student chose previous topic rather than one from list

 

Read Full Post »

As senior students head off on study leave, it’s time to think about supporting Year 9 and 10 students with their preparation for end of year exams.

I’ve found a new tool that I hope will spark some deeper thinking for junior students when revising novels and films. Flipgrid is a video discussion platform ideal for student engagement and formative assessment  that aims to amplify student voice, encourage self expression and build a sense of community. It is designed to move the learning process from inclusion and integration to transformation and finally empowerment.  Clearly, this has a wide range of applications in our classrooms.

There’s a great tutorial on the Microsoft Educators website here which I highly recommend.

All you need to to do is go to the Flipgrid website and work through the process of setting up various grids (subjects/tasks) and associated topics (questions) which students respond to via short videos. (This is the selfie generation so hopefully they won’t be too bashful – you can always let them respond in pairs to start with if it is an issue). Flipgrid was purchased by Microsoft recently so if you have a Microsoft account, simply sign up using that and, supply your school domain name so students’ email addresses can be verified.

There are a series of prompts to go through which took me no time at all and were easy to navigate – it pays to do the tutorial first to get your head around the difference between grids and topics. There are four basic steps:

  1. Build a grid – you can adjust preferences as you go
  2. Post a topic – pose a question to your students. You can also make a short video and model an answer, add links, attachments etc. Again you can set preferences for how long student replies should be, the time period the topic exists for, whether you want them to be able to comment on each others posts etc
  3. Share a site generated code with students.
  4. Students use the code to post their response.

On Friday of Week 1, I will show my Year 9 English class the site and go over some basic navigation. In the first topic, I have asked them to consider the importance of friendship  which was one of the key themes in a novel we studied. Specifically, I ask them to think about and explain how this message applies to them AND what they learned about friendship from the novel. The following week, I ask them share another book or film that also features this theme and the following week, ask them to imagine they are a reporter interviewing the main character and to share three questions they would ask him then explain why.

Students have detailed character and theme notes, access to whiteboard notes on ClassNotebook and have written a practice essay. At this end of the year, the aim is to encourage them to dig deeper and make connections beyond the events in the story.

I can moderate student responses and the grid is only accessible to us so hopefully, sharing their brief (1min 30) responses will inspire some big picture thinking.

I’m really excited about this tool and can see other ways, aside from revision, that it could be useful:

  1. Student feedback at end of year re text choice – likes, dislikes, suggestions
  2. Practicing oral presentations – students record their introduction/conclusion at home and get feedback off each other/teacher
  3. ESOL students could use it practice pronunciation with each other and their teacher
  4. Beginning of year introductions – invite students to share three facts and then match them to facts in class via teacher prompts or two truths and a lie. Work out the lie.
  5. Setting relief work/homework

 

 

Read Full Post »

Like many NZ schools, our seniors recently completed practice exams. These are an important way for learners to gauge areas of weakness they need to focus on before the upcoming NCEA examinations later in the year. As such, we aim to give them as much feedback as possible.

But when faced with large piles of marking across three year levels and a quick turnaround time (these grades also need to be entered into a database and report comments written shortly after), it can become a taxing and rushed job especially if you have a full teaching workload.

This year, I was keen to find a way to give students maximum feedback while avoiding the physical strain of handwriting lots of comments. My senior students all have access to ClassNotebook which features a content library as well as individual student folders. ClassNotebook is an online collaborative LMS offered as part of Microsoft Teams in the Office 365 suite of products.

Once I’d graded and written general comments on their papers, I went into each student’s individual folder and recorded supplementary feedback and feed forward using the insert audio function. So if I wrote on a student’s paper they needed to provide specific examples of how the setting impacted the character’s mood, in the audio recording I would give them suggestions and examples from the text naming locations within the story and explaining how they impacted on character’s state of mind.

Each audio recording is roughly 2-3 minutes long. The students can play them back as part of revision leading up the NCEA exams. They appreciated the more in depth feedback and I felt satisfied they I’d been able to more thoroughly explain myself. I also made a point of starting each recording with a positive statement of what they had done well and then rounded off with a general comment along the lines “if you can do this, this and this, you are on track to a Merit grade” or “if you wish to move to Excellence, you should read back the director’s notes and consider his opinions on rural NZ communities”. etc

A lot of English teacher jargon there but the approach would work for any subject.

Contrary to what you might think, it doesn’t take long once you’ve done a couple and enables a teacher to help students focus on exactly what they need to do to improve their final grades.

I also encouraged students to use the Office Lens app to take pictures of their exam papers and save them on the same page for back up in case they misplaced their papers between now and the end of the year.

The ball is now in their court!

 

Read Full Post »

Amidst the hurly burly of senior exam week, I shared and reviewed a raft of learning tools available via Microsoft 365 with our school’s teacher aides. They loved the read aloud function and had some good ideas about how they could use Office Lens with their learners too. Using read aloud via the edge browser was also a winner for them

The presentation was structured as a showcase followed by a why we would use it brainstorm and then later on, how would we use it. For some it was their first time sharing ideas via the collaboration space in a Notebook I have set up for them.

The downside was the devices we had in the school library weren’t running exactly the same versions/setting of MS as mine so that was a bit frustrating for them but I will follow up and get that sorted so there are half a dozen there they know have the tools we reviewed together.

And on the up, they’re keen to keep sharing ideas via a follow up workshop next term. Watch this space.

Here’s a link to what we’ve covered so far!

https://sway.office.com/5cXovvK2ivhzhDOb?ref=Link

 

 

Read Full Post »