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Posts Tagged ‘revision’

As senior students head off on study leave, it’s time to think about supporting Year 9 and 10 students with their preparation for end of year exams.

I’ve found a new tool that I hope will spark some deeper thinking for junior students when revising novels and films. Flipgrid is a video discussion platform ideal for student engagement and formative assessment  that aims to amplify student voice, encourage self expression and build a sense of community. It is designed to move the learning process from inclusion and integration to transformation and finally empowerment.  Clearly, this has a wide range of applications in our classrooms.

There’s a great tutorial on the Microsoft Educators website here which I highly recommend.

All you need to to do is go to the Flipgrid website and work through the process of setting up various grids (subjects/tasks) and associated topics (questions) which students respond to via short videos. (This is the selfie generation so hopefully they won’t be too bashful – you can always let them respond in pairs to start with if it is an issue). Flipgrid was purchased by Microsoft recently so if you have a Microsoft account, simply sign up using that and, supply your school domain name so students’ email addresses can be verified.

There are a series of prompts to go through which took me no time at all and were easy to navigate – it pays to do the tutorial first to get your head around the difference between grids and topics. There are four basic steps:

  1. Build a grid – you can adjust preferences as you go
  2. Post a topic – pose a question to your students. You can also make a short video and model an answer, add links, attachments etc. Again you can set preferences for how long student replies should be, the time period the topic exists for, whether you want them to be able to comment on each others posts etc
  3. Share a site generated code with students.
  4. Students use the code to post their response.

On Friday of Week 1, I will show my Year 9 English class the site and go over some basic navigation. In the first topic, I have asked them to consider the importance of friendship  which was one of the key themes in a novel we studied. Specifically, I ask them to think about and explain how this message applies to them AND what they learned about friendship from the novel. The following week, I ask them share another book or film that also features this theme and the following week, ask them to imagine they are a reporter interviewing the main character and to share three questions they would ask him then explain why.

Students have detailed character and theme notes, access to whiteboard notes on ClassNotebook and have written a practice essay. At this end of the year, the aim is to encourage them to dig deeper and make connections beyond the events in the story.

I can moderate student responses and the grid is only accessible to us so hopefully, sharing their brief (1min 30) responses will inspire some big picture thinking.

I’m really excited about this tool and can see other ways, aside from revision, that it could be useful:

  1. Student feedback at end of year re text choice – likes, dislikes, suggestions
  2. Practicing oral presentations – students record their introduction/conclusion at home and get feedback off each other/teacher
  3. ESOL students could use it practice pronunciation with each other and their teacher
  4. Beginning of year introductions – invite students to share three facts and then match them to facts in class via teacher prompts or two truths and a lie. Work out the lie.
  5. Setting relief work/homework

 

 

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With our seniors heading into practice exams next week, there’s been the usual flurry of emails this weekend from students in various stages of panic. While I am more than happy to give feedback to students who have come to class, contributed, met milestones and generally brought something to the learning table, it’s a little harder to know how to help those with questions like”Can you help with dystopia? I’m really confused.”

Like I said, difficult to know where to begin.

We’ve a got a few months yet ’til externals so I hope their questions will become a little more refined in the near future! In the meantime, I’ve had a go at summarising an Achievement Standard via a web based presentation tool called mysimpleshow. This allows you to explain topics using a range of templates to create a short video. You supply the script (there’s a word count limit per slide so it tests your skills in brevity). The programme then matches your words with visuals which you can keep, delete or replace and even reads the script for you. If you don’t like the male American script readers, you can record your own. Each step is navigated via a set of tabs at the top of the page logically labelled: Summarise, Visualise, Add Audio, Finalise.

I’ve used similar tools in the past – ShowMe is a great one to use on iPad. I’ve used it for Slide the Corner,  The Whale Rider and Level 2 ConnectionsOfficeMix will do similar for Microsoft people. These programmes enable you to project directly off the site or if you’re worried about WiFi connectivity, you can download and save your presentation. Another plus for time-poor teachers is these sites feature collections of presentations made by others so you might find what you need ready to use! (A bit like SlideShare).

Curation sites such as ScoopIt, which I love for students looking to elevate their thinking and make independent reflections on the text, are also helpful at this time of the year. It’s also handy for saving all the sites you bookmark for a topic in a more visually appealing space.

Mysimpleshow combines text, visual and audio elements catering for a range of learners. You can elect to turn subtitles on or off – I put them on – and choose the speed of the speaker. I view it as a starting point to get students focused on key concepts. For my subject area at least, students will always have to engage with material, develop their knowledge and then synthesise and express their ideas via a well structured written response but as we all know, starting if often the hardest bit!

Next time I teach these topics, before writing a practice essay, I’ll get students to hone their thoughts by creating their own  Simple Show – flipping the learning should enable them to reflect on the content in a meaningful way AND ensure they create their own revision resource for later in the year.  I’d call that a win:win.

 

 

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