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Posts Tagged ‘short films’

Like a lot of things, ANZAC Day has taken on a different shape and form this year.

As Week 3 looms, you might be feeling a distinct lack of energy for planning this long weekend. Below are some ideas for remote teaching and learning about ANZAC Day – relevant, timely and ready to go.

My short film viewing lessons are for junior secondary/Year 11. The links at the end take you to sites with a compilation of ideas/resources which also feature ideas for younger learners.

The short film Falling Sparrows (directed by Murray Keane) is available on the NZ On Screen website. You might need to supply students with a resource around film terms first. They could make a Kahoot, Quizlet or cross word to share with you. Students then watch the film, answer the following focus questions, then discuss in a group meet. Open with the question from the film’s synopsis: What do you think about the statement that for the boys, “war’s a game and nobody dies”? That’s a week’s worth right there.

  1. What does the monument symbolise (represent, make you think of)?
  2. How does the director tie together the beginning and the end?
  3. What (or who) do the dead sparrows represent (think of the title)?
  4. What do you notice about the boys’ dialogue (What they say to each other and how they say it)?
  5. Give one example of diegetic sound (sound you’d hear if you were there)
  6. Give one example of non-diegetic sound (added in editing process)
  7. Name 2 film techniques used (e.g pan, slow motion, dissolve) and describe their effect.
  8. “Blue Dragon” has trouble telling the difference between reality and fantasy. How is this shown?
  9. How is humour used?
  10. How is tension created?
  11. What is important about the shot of the two sparrows flying in the sky after the accidents?
  12. How does the mood change at the end?
  13. What do you think the message (theme) is?

Tama Tü directed by Taika Waititi is another short film featured on NZ On Screen. Students can watch the film, answer the questions below and complete the reflective writing. This could be a springboard for creative or formal writing at Level 1 or the close viewing assessment. The film also has links to Maori Battalion.

  1. The crow is a tohu (sign). What does it represent?
  2. What is the name of the jerky camera movement used at the start? Why is it used?
  3. Name 2 things you hear or see that tell us this is a war zone.
  4. Name 2 different signals the men use to communicate to each other.
  5. The director says “even at war… boys will be boys”. How does he show us that?
  6. What is the significance of placing the manaia (a mythical creature that wards off danger) next to the toy soldier?

Journal writing: Imagine that you are a soldier in a ruined city in World War I. Describe what you can see, the thoughts running through your head and your feelings.

Other ANZAC sites for remote learning:

If you need resources around film terms for pre-teaching/revision, feel free to message me.

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