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Posts Tagged ‘showme’

With our seniors heading into practice exams next week, there’s been the usual flurry of emails this weekend from students in various stages of panic. While I am more than happy to give feedback to students who have come to class, contributed, met milestones and generally brought something to the learning table, it’s a little harder to know how to help those with questions like”Can you help with dystopia? I’m really confused.”

Like I said, difficult to know where to begin.

We’ve a got a few months yet ’til externals so I hope their questions will become a little more refined in the near future! In the meantime, I’ve had a go at summarising an Achievement Standard via a web based presentation tool called mysimpleshow. This allows you to explain topics using a range of templates to create a short video. You supply the script (there’s a word count limit per slide so it tests your skills in brevity). The programme then matches your words with visuals which you can keep, delete or replace and even reads the script for you. If you don’t like the male American script readers, you can record your own. Each step is navigated via a set of tabs at the top of the page logically labelled: Summarise, Visualise, Add Audio, Finalise.

I’ve used similar tools in the past – ShowMe is a great one to use on iPad. I’ve used it for Slide the Corner,  The Whale Rider and Level 2 ConnectionsOfficeMix will do similar for Microsoft people. These programmes enable you to project directly off the site or if you’re worried about WiFi connectivity, you can download and save your presentation. Another plus for time-poor teachers is these sites feature collections of presentations made by others so you might find what you need ready to use! (A bit like SlideShare).

Curation sites such as ScoopIt, which I love for students looking to elevate their thinking and make independent reflections on the text, are also helpful at this time of the year. It’s also handy for saving all the sites you bookmark for a topic in a more visually appealing space.

Mysimpleshow combines text, visual and audio elements catering for a range of learners. You can elect to turn subtitles on or off – I put them on – and choose the speed of the speaker. I view it as a starting point to get students focused on key concepts. For my subject area at least, students will always have to engage with material, develop their knowledge and then synthesise and express their ideas via a well structured written response but as we all know, starting if often the hardest bit!

Next time I teach these topics, before writing a practice essay, I’ll get students to hone their thoughts by creating their own  Simple Show – flipping the learning should enable them to reflect on the content in a meaningful way AND ensure they create their own revision resource for later in the year.  I’d call that a win:win.

 

 

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Over the past few weeks, the #hackyrclass community have been sharing ideas about #blendedlearning and #differentiation. The challenge is how to walk the talk in the teaching and learning environments many state and state integrated secondary school teachers operate in on a daily basis. While it’s easy to get enthused sharing ideas with your online community of fellow teacher geeks (sorry guys) it’s often a different story back at school the next day. I think if we were to be completely honest, many of us would admit that our physical resources including access to ICTs often put a big hand brake on making these worthy ideals a reality.

That said, rather than focusing on what we can’t do in small spaces with minimal available technology, I’m hopeful it’s the little things we can do that will set in motion the paradigm shift needed to make blended learning the norm. So here are a couple of small things I’ve tried recently with a trusty data projector, internet and an iPad:

Creative writing
1. Brainspark app projected off iPad as starter – you can use words or pictures to get them writing
2. Storystart app’s photo gallery projected for students to select a setting to write about
3. Showme tutorial to reinforce the concept of showing not telling when writing creatively. There is a Showme app as well which has loads of potential for students to create their own tutorials too.
4. Gave iPad to student to take a couple of pics outside for a writing assessment. He just couldn’t find a way to start otherwise.

Reading
I’ve now got most of my Year 9s signed up to taierihotreads and they are starting to blog about books they are reading. We developed a set of class rules around commenting and these are displayed in class. I also developed a help sheet to get them going which included making the actual steps clear, pointers as to content, some starter sentences and a word bank. Quality and depth of reflection varies but I’m still hopeful this is a step in the right direction for encouraging reading, developing critical literacy and writing for publication. I have found the hardest thing has been getting them to remember passwords and logins. Think I’ll design credit card sized card for them all next time to keep handy.

It’s been great to have a few people outside the class commenting on posts. This really bolsters their confidence and helps give the students ownership of the site which is the ultimate aim.

Keeping it current
I couldn’t pass up these opportunities to make links outside class with seniors:
1. YouTube clip of well-known Americans reading I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings following Maya Angelou’s recent passing. Used with Level 2s who are focusing on texts that fit the theme of The Voiceless this term.
2. Used start of this Radio NZ flashback to 1994 including an  interview with Rena Owen prior to viewing Once Were Warriors today (heard it previewed in car on way to work – #alwaysworking)
3. Used The Boy Who Danced With a Tank poem by Adrian Mitchell to coincide with 25th anniversary of Tiananmen Square rebellion. Watched TVNZ item broad cast last week for background.

It’s a start.

 

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